Mosig receives sanction for positive test

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Kade Mosig, image by Fullnoise.com.au

Oh my, I really don’t want to write this, I’ve known Kade for a long time, junior photos are on walls of my house along with signed memorabilia. The fact is though, he has made poor decisions and it has cost him. We all make mistakes, that is life, however to move forward we have to learn from our mistakes.

What really frustrates me is the time length in going through a case with WADA/ASADA, they are in independent body, have independent courts and it takes years to finalise a case. I also disagree with the ‘member facilities’ clause, which basically means any MA affiliated complex Kade can’t enter as spectator. That is why riders drop off the map when they are sanctioned, and for a rider that has been racing most of their life they can’t support friends at a track. I am not going to make excuses, the findings on a personal level are disappointing especially the trafficking infringement, and another case similar to Kim Ashkenazi without jail time.

Kade has impressive Motocross and Supercross skills, it was great to watch him ride and race. Knowing Kade for such a long time the back story to these poor choices has many triggers, loss of close friends by riding/racing accidents and self harm. I wish Kade all the best in the future. I hope that he throws a leg over a bike now and then for fun. It would be awesome if he made a similar return to racing like Kim Ashkenazi at the end of the sanction. I’d like to see a happy ending to Kade’s story in motocross/supercross.

===MA PRESS RELEASE===

Kade Mosig has received a six-year sanction for 19 violations of Motorcycling Australia’s (MA) anti-doping policy.

Mosig tested positive to the prohibited substances exogenous 19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone and D-amphetamine following a doping control test conducted by the Australian Sports Anti-doping Authority on May 27, 2018 at the MX Nationals in Murray Bridge, South Australia.

Motorcycling Australia imposed a mandatory provisional suspension on Mr Mosig on July 10, 2018, and his sanction has been backdated to take account time he has already served.

This means Mr Mosig is ineligible to participate, as an athlete or support person (including coaching or officiating) until he has completed his six-year sanction. The ban includes using Member facilities.

In addition to the six-year sanction all competitive results for Mr Mosig from December 9, 2013 onwards will be removed from records.

Mr Mosig will be eligible to recommence participation in the sport from July 10, 2024.

Mr Mosig in a statement said: “I accept the sanction imposed on me understanding I have made some poor decisions in the past”.

“I want to apologise to my family, friends, competitors, supporters and my sponsors.

“Regrettably I will be moving on from racing professionally and will be making no further comment on this matter”

===ASDA PRESS RELEASE===

The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) today acknowledged the decision of Motorcycling Australia to sanction athlete Kade Mosig for the Presence; Use and/or Attempted Use (eight separate violations); Possession (six separate violations), and Trafficking and/or Attempted Trafficking (four separate violations) of prohibited substances.

Mr Mosig returned an Adverse Analytical Finding (AAF) from an in-competition doping control test on 27 May 2018.

His sample was analysed at the Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory, part of the National Measurement Institute, which detected the presence of Prohibited Substances:

  • 19-Norandrosterone and 19-Noretiocholanolone (metabolites of exogenous Nandrolone, Norandrostenedione or Norandrostenediol); and D-Amphetamine.

In addition to the AAF the Athlete committed violations of:

  • Use of Nandrolone, Norandrostenedione or Norandrostenediol on and/or before 27 May 2018;
  • Attempted Use of IGF-1 and/or CJC-1295 on and/or after 11 January 2014;
  • Possession of IGF-1 and/or CJC-1295 on and/or after 11 January 2014;
  • Trafficking and/or Attempted Trafficking of IGF-1 and/or CJC-1295 on or about 11 January 2014;
  • Attempted Use of Clenbuterol on or about 9 December 2013 to on or about 21 February 2014;
  • Possession of Clenbuterol on or about 9 December 2013 to on or about 21 February 2014;
  • Attempted Use of Clenbuterol and/or Testosterone on or about 15 December 2014;
  • Possession of Clenbuterol and/or Testosterone on or about 15 December 2014;
  • Trafficking and/or Attempted Trafficking of Growth Hormone on and/or after 15 December 2014;
  • Use and/or Attempted Use of Growth Hormone on or about 1 January 2014 to on or about 31 December 2015;
  • Possession of Growth Hormone on or about 1 January 2014 to on or about 31 December 2015;
  • Trafficking and/or Attempted Trafficking of Clenbuterol on or about 6 November 2015;
  • Attempted Use of Growth Hormone on and/or after 24 November 2017;
  • Possession of Growth Hormone on and/or after 24 November 2017;
  • Use and/or Attempted Use of Growth Hormone on or about 4 January 2018 to on or about 8 February 2018;
  • Attempted Trafficking of Growth Hormone on and/or after 4 January 2018;
  • Use and/or Attempted Use of Testosterone on or about 23 May 2018; and
  • Possession of Testosterone on and/or before 27 May 2018.

Motorcycling Australia imposed a six year ban on Mr Mosig commencing on 10 July 2018.

Mr Mosig is ineligible to participate in any sports that have adopted a World Anti-Doping Code compliant anti-doping policy until 10 July 2024. He is also not permitted to compete in a non-signatory professional league, or event organised by a non-signatory International or National level event organisation.

Additional information on the prohibited substances

Nandrolone, Norandrostenedione and Norandrostenediol
The substances 19-Norandrosterone and 19-Noretiocholanolone (metabolites of Nandrolone, Norandrostenedione or Norandrostenediol) are Class S1.1b (Endogenous Anabolic Androgenic Steroids) substances under the World Anti-Doping Code Prohibited List and are prohibited at all times.

Nandrolone, Norandrostenedione and Norandrostenediol are listed under Schedule 4, Appendix D, Item 5 of the Poisons Standard and are therefore regulated poisons.  Possession without authority is an offence.

Some of the general side effects of Nandrolone include swelling of ankles or feet, increased blood pressure, rash and increased or decreased sexual desire. Nandrolone also shows specific side effects in males, for example enlargement of the breast, difficulty to urinate due to growth of the prostate, reduction in sperm count, testicular atrophy and impotence. In females, Nandrolone could cause changes of the voice, which may be long-lasting or permanent, increased body or facial hair, and masculinisation.

Nandrolone, Norandrostenedione or Norandrostenediol are prohibited imports under the Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulation 1956. Importation into Australia without a permit is an offence.

D-amphetamine
Under the Prohibited List, D-amphetamine is classified as a stimulant and is prohibited in-competition.

Generally, stimulants act directly on the central nervous system to speed up parts of the brain and body. They can increase alertness and reduce fatigue in athletes.

Insulin-like Growth Factor-1
Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) is classed as a category S2 substance on the Prohibited List and is prohibited in- and out-of-competition. Used for a range of therapeutic purposes, its use may cause anabolic effects such as tissue growth.

IGF-1 has  a number of serious side effects can result from its use including increased risk of cardiovascular disease, liver damage and hypoglycaemia.

CJC-1295
CJC-1295 is prohibited at all times under Class S2.3 (Peptide Hormones and their Releasing Factors) of the Prohibited List.

There are a number of health concerns for Class S2 Peptide Hormones and their Releasing Factors. Long-term studies in the use of growth hormone releasing peptides (GHRPs) have not been performed as the majority available on the internet have not been approved for human use. However, given that these peptides are used to release growth hormone, excessive amounts in healthy people may cause side effects like those observed in people with acromegaly, such as cardiovascular disease.

Clenbuterol and Testosterone
Clenbuterol and Testosterone are classed as S1 anabolic agents on the Prohibited List and are prohibited in and out-of-competition.

Anabolic agents pose many threats to an athlete’s health and some side effects may include an increase in blood pressure and cholesterol levels which can lead to heart disease. Liver disease and infertility can also result from the use of these agents.

Growth Hormone
Similar to other anabolic agents, it is said that growth hormone promotes the production of lean body mass, and it has the ability to burn fat and hence it is attractive to certain athletes seeking performance enhancement.

Growth hormone is prohibited at all times under S2.3 (Peptide Hormones and their Releasing Factors).

Growth hormone use side effects can include  fluid retention, musculoskeletal stiffness, joint and muscle painand also hypoglycaemia and subsequently hyperglycaemia. It should be noted that growth hormone has been associated with an increased risk of certain cancers.

ASADA is committed to protecting the right of clean athletes to fair competition. If you are aware of any suspicious doping activity, you can report it anonymously via the ASADA website: www.asada.gov.au/report-doping or call us on 13 000 27232.

ASADA recommends you check all your substances before you take them on the ASADA Clean Sport app. For more information visit: ASADA tech.